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#41 [url]

Jan 7 10 2:12 AM

Late getting to this thread but strangely enough it says "that video has been removed by the user". What was on it please Lou?

-emeline

The guy took a video with the damn clouds going BEHIND the moon!  Clear as day, as it were.

See if you can google some key words and bring it up on you tube or something.

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periol

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#42 [url]

Jan 7 10 4:10 AM

This moon is something else right now.Last night was the lowest low tide I've ever seen at the stretch of beach I go to, by a good margin.  The tide literally dropped 200 feet further from shore than I've ever seen.  I'm sure it's happened before - I've only been going to this location for about six months now, although I basically go daily.  I'm pretty used to the rhythms in this area, and the waves break pretty far from shore here, and I have never, ever, ever been able to walk out to the break on dry land.  Well, not exactly dry land - more a bed of seashells.  Usually the shells are gone, because folks go collecting early in the morning, but the tide was so low the shells people can't get to without scuba gear were exposed.But that's what I did last night.  It's like someone took a giant straw and started sucking out the ocean.  It really was crazy to see.

-periol

Hey Lou, I posted this on the 4th of October, only a few days after you started this thread.

The tide had dropped ridiculously low, a level I had never seen.  Like, never even close to seen.  Tonight was the first night that it looked more like a regular low tide than like someone sucked the water out of the ocean.

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#43 [url]

Jan 7 10 12:02 PM

???

I have no idea why I didn't see that.  Of course, I could have read it and completely forgot. My memory is getting to the point I could just about plan my own surprise party.

Anyway....

Are you able to ask anyone who's lived there a long time about it?  That seems a bit odd to be some sort of regular occurrence.  Not only that, I would assume you'd have seen something similar in other areas where you've walked the beach.  Weird.

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#44 [url]

Jan 7 10 12:09 PM

Here's something weird I've been meaning to make a post on.

For the past two winters Jerry and I talked about how at 5:00 and later it was still light out.  Two winters ago I mentioned it and he said, "You know, I wasn't going to mention it because I thought I was going crazy; but for my entire working life I've always gone home in the dark in the winter."

Last winter it was the same.  Even deep into December.

This year?  As soon as the time changed it's dark as night by 5:00-ish.

We live far enough north that by mid-December it's nearly dark by 4:00 - 4:30.  Conversely, it's always light until 11:00 and later in the summer.

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periol

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#46 [url]

Jan 7 10 5:21 PM

???I have no idea why I didn't see that.  Of course, I could have read it and completely forgot. My memory is getting to the point I could just about plan my own surprise party.Anyway....Are you able to ask anyone who's lived there a long time about it?  That seems a bit odd to be some sort of regular occurrence.  Not only that, I would assume you'd have seen something similar in other areas where you've walked the beach.  Weird.

-mtlouie

Oh, I talked to folks about it.  They thought it was weird too.  I mean, there were low tides before, but it was REALLY low.

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periol

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#47 [url]

Jan 7 10 7:33 PM

Here's something weird I've been meaning to make a post on.For the past two winters Jerry and I talked about how at 5:00 and later it was still light out.  Two winters ago I mentioned it and he said, "You know, I wasn't going to mention it because I thought I was going crazy; but for my entire working life I've always gone home in the dark in the winter."Last winter it was the same.  Even deep into December.This year?  As soon as the time changed it's dark as night by 5:00-ish.We live far enough north that by mid-December it's nearly dark by 4:00 - 4:30.  Conversely, it's always light until 11:00 and later in the summer.

-mtlouie

I've noticed.  These are the kind of things I notice.

I went to college in New Hampshire, and I lived there for 4 years after graduation, got married, etc.  I was depressed ALL THE TIME and I kept trying to convince my wife to move away, but she would not do it.  Finally, after we separated, I moved south, to the New York City area.  Just that seemingly short distance made a huge difference with sunlight, and my depression just kind of vanished.  

So anyways, after that I've paid attention to the sun, and when I finally moved back to socal I really noticed the difference with the light.  Sunlight matters to my frame of mind.

This year is crazy though.  It's a good thing I'm unemployed, or my dog and I would be missing the sunsets.  Yesterday we left the house at 4:30 to go to the beach, and the sun was setting.  It was fully dark when we left the beach at 5:15.  FULL ON DARKNESS.  

I don't even know what to say about it.  I can't speak to the mornings, because I have yet to wake up before the sun since the time changed (LOL) and I'm sure someone somewhere can explain it, but other folks at the dog beach have been complaining about it.  All I know is I grew up around here, and this is not normal.  We are far south.

Also, just a weird note, a couple of weeks ago I drove up to Long Beach, which is about 30 minutes away, and it was getting late to stopped at the dog beach there with Roxie.  At 5.  And it stayed light until well past 5:30.  Maybe it's Catalina blocking the setting sun, but we're talking about basically an extra 30 minutes of light just by driving 30 minutes north.  

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emeline

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#48 [url]

Jan 7 10 9:29 PM

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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emeline

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#49 [url]

Jan 7 10 9:33 PM


Actually I looked at some of those "clouds behind the moon videos" and to be honest my first thoughts were, that isn't the moon.

Spaceship?  Mothership?  That would explain why so many people are seeing the "moon" do weird things in strange locations - odd shaped, in the wrong position in the sky etc.

www.tmg.now archives had some good evidence of the moons of Mars doing similar things.

The "moons" are really alien satellites/spaceships of some kind?  I know we've pondered on that many times before and really, it would explain quite a lot.

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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periol

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#51 [url]

Jan 29 10 5:48 AM



So after a bit of searching this looks like our official moon thread.  I'm moving it to the pinned section.

Also, I wanted to post this article.  They really are doing lots of funny things before 12/21.  Also, best explanation for doing funny things EVER.  By the way, I think when they say the chances are 8 in one million, they mean 1 in 125,000, right?  

Two Space Probes to Crash, Intentionally, on Dark Side of Moon



http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/14/science/space/two-space-probes-to-crash-intentionally-on-moon.html?_r=0


NASA’s latest Moon mission will end on Monday — not with a whimper, but a splat.


Two splats, actually.

Ebb and Flow, two space probes the size of washing machines that have been orbiting the Moon and measuring its gravity field, will perform an orchestrated death plunge on Monday, crashing into the body’s dark side.

The exercise will not be for the advance of science, but rather something of a garbage-disposal operation, to make sure that the probes — which are running out of fuel — do not come to rest in a historically significant place, like on Neil Armstrong’s footprints.


The Moon has been affronted this way many times before, especially during the space race of the 1960s, but NASA is now trying to dispose of its litter more carefully.

This time, the first impact will come 40 seconds past 5:38 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Dec. 17 when Ebb slams into a mountain near the Moon’s north pole at 3,760 miles per hour. The second, from Ebb’s twin, Flow, will come 20 seconds later.

Unfortunately, since the action will happen on the dark side of the Moon, there will be nothing for earthlings to see.

“We’re not expecting a flash that is visible from Earth,” Maria T. Zuber, the mission’s primary investigator, said Thursday during a telephone news conference.

That is all by design as NASA wraps up its Grail Recovery and Interior Laboratory mission, or Grail, for short.

To map the gravity, the two spacecraft are in an orbit passing over the Moon’s north and south poles. They pass over all parts of the lunar surface as the Moon rotates below.


If the probes’ fuel ran out and their orbits decayed, they could crash anywhere on the Moon, including a slim chance — eight in one million — that one of them could obliterate those famous footprints or another historic site.



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periol

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#53 [url]

Apr 12 10 12:47 PM


Water on the moon: it’s been there all along

http://www.kurzweilai.net/water-on-the-moon-its-been-there-all-along

Traces of water have been detected within the crystalline structure of mineral samples from the lunar highland upper crust obtained during the Apollo missions, according to a University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues.

The lunar highlands are thought to represent the original crust, crystallized from a magma ocean on a mostly molten early moon. The new findings indicate that the early moon was wet and that water there was not substantially lost during the moon’s formation.

The results seem to contradict the predominant lunar formation theory — that the moon was formed from debris generated during a giant impact between Earth and another planetary body, approximately the size of Mars, according to U-M’s Youxue Zhang and his colleagues.

Over the last five years, spacecraft observations and new lab measurements of Apollo lunar samples have overturned the long-held belief that the moon is bone-dry.

In 2008, laboratory measurement of Apollo lunar samples by ion microprobe detected indigenous hydrogen, inferred to be the water-related chemical species hydroxyl, in lunar volcanic glasses. In 2009, NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing satellite, known as LCROSS, slammed into a permanently shadowed lunar crater and ejected a plume of material that was surprisingly rich in water ice.

Hydroxyls have also been detected in other volcanic rocks and in the lunar regolith, the layer of fine powder and rock fragments that coats the lunar surface. Hydroxyls, which consist of one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen, were also detected in the lunar anorthosite study reported in Nature Geoscience.

In the latest work, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to analyze the water content in grains of plagioclase feldspar from lunar anorthosites, highland rocks composed of more than 90 percent plagioclase. The bright-colored highlands rocks are thought to have formed early in the moon’s history when plagioclase crystallized from a magma ocean and floated to the surface.

The infrared spectroscopy work, which was conducted at Zhang’s U-M lab and co-author Anne H. Peslier’s lab, detected about 6 parts per million of water in the lunar anorthosites.

“The surprise discovery of this work is that in lunar rocks, even in nominally water-free minerals such as plagioclase feldspar, the water content can be detected,” said Zhang, James R. O’Neil Collegiate Professor of Geological Sciences.

“It’s not ‘liquid’ water that was measured during these studies but hydroxyl groups distributed within the mineral grain,” said Notre Dame’s Hui. “We are able to detect those hydroxyl groups in the crystalline structure of the Apollo samples.”

The hydroxyl groups the team detected are evidence that the lunar interior contained significant water during the moon’s early molten state, before the crust solidified, and may have played a key role in the development of lunar basalts. “The presence of water,” said Hui, “could imply a more prolonged solidification of the lunar magma ocean than the once-popular anhydrous moon scenario suggests.”

The researchers analyzed grains from ferroan anorthosites 15415 and 60015, as well as troctolite 76535. Ferroan anorthosite 15415 is one the best known rocks of the Apollo collection and is popularly called the Genesis Rock because the astronauts thought they had a piece of the moon’s primordial crust. It was collected on the rim of Apur Crater during the Apollo 15 mission.

The work was supported by NASA.

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periol

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#54 [url]

Jul 2 10 6:55 PM


Bright Explosion on the Moon

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2013/16may_lunarimpact/

May 17, 2013:  For the past 8 years, NASA astronomers have been monitoring the Moon for signs of explosions caused by meteoroids hitting the lunar surface. "Lunar meteor showers" have turned out to be more common than anyone expected, with hundreds of detectable impacts occurring every year.

They've just seen the biggest explosion in the history of the program.

"On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," says Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Anyone looking at the Moon at the moment of impact could have seen the explosion--no telescope required.  For about one second, the impact site was glowing like a 4th magnitude star.

Ron Suggs, an analyst at the Marshall Space Flight Center, was the first to notice the impact in a digital video recorded by one of the monitoring program's 14-inch telescopes.  "It jumped right out at me, it was so bright," he recalls.

The 40 kg meteoroid measuring 0.3 to 0.4 meters wide hit the Moon traveling 56,000 mph.  The resulting explosion1 packed as much punch as 5 tons of TNT.

Cooke believes the lunar impact might have been part of a much larger event.

"On the night of March 17, NASA and University of Western Ontario all-sky cameras picked up an unusual number of deep-penetrating meteors right here on Earth," he says. "These fireballs were traveling along nearly identical orbits between Earth and the asteroid belt."

This means Earth and the Moon were pelted by meteoroids at about the same time  “My working hypothesis is that the two events are related, and that this constitutes a short duration cluster of material encountered by the Earth-Moon system," says Cooke.



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antelopone

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#55 [url]

Jul 3 10 4:52 PM

The moon, sun, earth and all the planets are taking on much more cosmic space dust into their upper atmospheres and will begin to be seen as brighter with much larger coronas.   (One crop circle has the sun's corona expanded out to the orbit of venus eventually).  This increased space dust volume is due the the transit of our solar system into the upper half of the galactic rim since December 2012 where the concentrations of cosmic space dust (mostly frozen bacteria) are much much greater. 
   All of the planets in our solar system our taking on massive amounts of this space dust and will seem much brighter and bigger.  This added space dust is a good thing as our sun is heating up and likely will go thru a Black Sun event in mid 2016 as many astrologers predict something major for Earth then.  This added dust should very much protect the Earth and Mars from intense solar activity just as the chemtrails were conceived to protect the earth.
   I also expect all the psychic arts to be much more accurate now with this increased space dust.  The ether is more dense and conductive and so psychic connections are becoming much stronger and vivid.  Try predicting the lotto numbers (during daylight hours) to see if your hits are increasing to test this theory.  -- J.E. Ante

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