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ericreinhardt2003

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#21 [url]

Dec 25 08 7:16 PM

The problem with many scientists is that they become so consumed in their science and in "advancements' that they neglect the ethical and moral implications of their work. The same happens with the Wall Street crowd and with other professions as well.

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emeline

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#24 [url]

Oct 19 09 10:12 AM

IARPA’s Synthetic Holographic Observation program: developing advanced dynamic holographic displays

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA) – the intelligence community’s equivalent of DARPA, about which we write about regularly here at End the Lie – is not only working on silent drones. They are now pursuing a program called Synthetic Holographic Observation or SHO.

In the description of their program provided with the Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) posted last year on the Federal Business Opportunities website, they reveal just how ambitious this program is.

While the solicitation was first posted in July of 2011, IARPA actually just gave out a whopping $58,328,021 contract to Ostendo Technologies of Carlsbad, California to build the prototype SHO system on August 15, 2012.
“Today’s 3D cameras and displays offer solutions to entertainment markets. These displays provide a single perspective of a scene (e.g., videogames, movie theaters), or else dynamic multi-perspectives to a single viewer with and without special glasses, using head-tracking,” explains the solicitation.

Obviously, such restrictions are by no means acceptable when it comes to use by the military and intelligence community which receives more funding than any other in the world.


More at EndtheLie.com - http://EndtheLie.com/2012/08/28/iarpas-synthetic-holographic-observation-program-developing-advanced-dynamic-holographic-displays/#ixzz25OsEANoE


Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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periol

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Posts: 1,653

#25 [url]

Oct 20 09 7:40 PM


found this great comment on /. today.  discussing an article from a guy who suggests leaving your phone at home for privacy reasons:

-----------------

"There, fixed that for ya. Amazing how they managed to get darned near 100% of the population to agree to carry around a tracking device with nary a peep. All it took was to be very careful to NOT talk about the tracking ability, keep news accounts of the police using the cell data off the front page and make the tracker shiny and useful enough. Do those things and not only will everyone carry one they will pay an average of $50/mo for the privledge. Land of the Free indeed.

Won't be long now before they decide they have the hook set deep enough they can start making more overt use of the location/activity data without many people ditching their tracker.

The carriers WILL start renting out access to track data for advertising purposes. They know where and when you are. They will be able to link that beyond your phone. Won't take much computation to get that localized enough to have a good idea which PC you use and then tie it to doubleclick and google's cookies. Then they know EVERYTHING. Combine a tracking cookie to hard billing quality identification data and the possibilities are truly limitless. Sure they COULD do that with Amazon but there is too great a chance of a user revolt. But people won't/can't give up their iShiny.

What law enforcement will do with the data is so obvious and so dark there isn't much point in hammering it again really. Especially combined with security cameras everywhere. Who cares if the image quality isn't good enough for a positive id or you were wearing a hoodie. It gives a time/location and the tracker gives them who was at that spot in spacetime.

Bust a drug dealer and you have probable cause to grab a trace on everyone who came in contact with that person for the last month. Crunch the numbers enough and lots of patterns emerge. Not quite precrime but close enough. You show up as having been in the room with a number of dealers and that will be your ass. Or be around a few people who later get busted for burgulary and how soon until that is cause for a search warrant on your place? Being able to effortlessly work backwards from a bust and turn up clues like that will change the law enforcement game entirely.

And now you see why AT&T yanked all their payphones and for some reason simply refuses to compete in the landline business, even with billions and billions in sunk costs for all that wire going everywhere. Eliminate hardlines and everyone MUST buy a cell. It is already sorta odd to encounter someone who doesn't carry one, eventually it will be reasonable suspicion of criminal activity. Wouldn't suprise me if they become the preferred physical identifier, i.e. 'your papers.'"

http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3093657&cid=41224479

and the whole story is here...

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/09/04/1552228/leave-your-cellphone-at-home-says-jacob-appelbaum

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periol

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#26 [url]

Oct 20 09 7:48 PM


here's the original interview with jacob appelbaum

Leave Your Cellphone at Home
http://nplusonemag.com/leave-your-cellphone-at-home

Resnick: What should we know about cell phones? It’s hard to imagine going to a protest without one. But like all networked technologies, surely they are double-edged?

Appelbaum: Cell phones are tracking devices that make phone calls. It’s sad, but it’s true. Which means software solutions don’t always matter. You can have a secure set of tools on your phone, but it doesn’t change the fact that your phone tracks everywhere you go. And the police can potentially push updates onto your phone that backdoor it and allow it to be turned into a microphone remotely, and do other stuff like that. The police can identify everybody at a protest by bringing in a device called an IMSI catcher. It’s a fake cell phone tower that can be built for 1500 bucks. And once nearby, everybody’s cell phones will automatically jump onto the tower, and if the phone’s unique identifier is exposed, all the police have to do is go to the phone company and ask for their information.

Resnick: So phones are tracking devices. They can also be used for surreptitious recording. Would taking the battery out disable this capability? 

Appelbaum: Maybe. But iPhones, for instance, don’t have a removable battery; they power off via the power button. So if I wrote a backdoor for the iPhone, it would play an animation that looked just like a black screen. And then when you pressed the button to turn it back on it would pretend to boot. Just play two videos.

Resnick: And how easy is it to create something like to that?

Appelbaum: There are weaponized toolkits sold by companies like FinFisher that enable breaking into BlackBerries, Android phones, iPhones, Symbian devices and other platforms. And with a single click, say, the police can own a person, and take over her phone.

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concernedmomma

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#27 [url]

Oct 20 09 10:58 PM

all cars these days have tracking chips as well ..and can be locked and shut off remotely for the cops to get ya ..LOL

Well aren't you just a fun little lollipop triple dipped in psycho......

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spacecase0

Illustrious Alchemist

Posts: 792

#28 [url]

Oct 20 09 11:21 PM

my car does not have one, it was teh american cars that started that,
you can get later cars form japan without them
and don't forget that you can get after market CPUs for cars that give you total control
http://www.aemelectronics.com/engine-management-systems-9/plug-play-engine-management-systems-ems-10/
just make sure to get a car that they make it easy to connect and set up

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periol

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#29 [url]

Oct 21 09 7:37 AM

FBI Tracking 12 Million iPhones and iPads

Several hours ago, the latest hacker group to gain prominence, AntiSec, a subset of Anonymous, disclosed that it had obtained the confidential user data contained in some some 12 million Apple units after hacking an FBI Dell Vostro notebook computer, "used by Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java" which contined a file titled NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv, which "turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device, type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone numbers, addresses, etc. the personal details fields referring to people appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts." In other words, the FBI had the personal data of a substantial number of Apple device users, certainly all of which had been obtained without prior permission. Naturally the question here is why on earth does the FBI have this data, and as TNW suggests, "They published the UDID numbers to call attention to suspicions that the FBI used the information to track citizens. Much of the personal data has been trimmed, however, with the hackers claiming to have left enough for “a significant amount of users” to search for their devices." AntiSec has subsequently released one million of these UUIDs and their associated data. Find out if your device is on the list as explained below.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/find-out-if-your-apple-device-was-among-12-million-units-hacked-and-tracked-fbi

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periol

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#31 [url]

Oct 22 09 8:17 PM


Found this video on Silent Country.  An excellent news piece on the explosive growth of private and public drones.  MUST WATCH!

Rise of the Machines
http://www.abc.net.au/foreign/

USA - Rise of the Machines

Any comfy views you have about your personal security, privacy and safety are about to be seriously challenged. Foreign Correspondent sounds the alarm on the swarms of private and government drones gathering in American skies and surely bound for the rest of the world. Live streaming cameras and the ability to carry other payloads. Tens of thousands of them. But who's at the controls? Police, immigration patrols, journalists, protesters, paparazzi? You?

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periol

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#32 [url]

Oct 24 09 2:53 AM



FBI launches $1 billion nationwide facial recognition system

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/135665-fbi-launches-1-billion-nationwide-facial-recognition-system

The US Federal Bureau of Investigation has begun rolling out its new $1 billion biometric Next Generation Identification (NGI) system. In essence, NGI is a nationwide database of mugshots, iris scans, DNA records, voice samples, and other biometrics, that will help the FBI identify and catch criminals — but it is how this biometric data is captured, through a nationwide network of cameras and photo databases, that is raising the eyebrows of privacy advocates.

Until now, the FBI relied on IAFIS, a national fingerprint database that has long been due an overhaul. Over the last few months, the FBI has been pilot testing a facial recognition system — and soon, detectives will also be able to search the system for other biometrics such as DNA records and iris scans. In theory, this should result in much faster positive identifications of criminals and fewer unsolved cases.

According to New Scientist, facial recognition systems have reached the point where they can match a single face from a pool of 1.6 million mugshots/passport photos with 92% accuracy, in under 1.2 seconds [PDF]. In the case of automated, biometric border controls where your face and corresponding mugshot are well lit, the accuracy approaches 100%. Likewise, where DNA or iris records exist, it’s a very expedient way of accurately identifying suspects.

So far, so good — catching criminals faster and making less false arrests must be a good thing, right? Well, yes, but there are some important caveats that we must bear in mind. For a start, the pilot study has only used mugshots and driving license photos of known criminals — but the FBI hasn’t guaranteed that this will always be the case. There may come a time when the NGI is filled with as many photos as possible, from as many sources as possible, of as many people as possible — criminal or otherwise. This might be as overt as parsing CCTV footage and collating every single face into a database; or maybe you’re just unlucky and your face ends up in the system because you’re in the background of a photo starring a known criminal.

Imagine if the NGI had full access to every driving license and passport photo in the country — and DNA records kept by doctors, and iris scans kept by businesses. The FBI’s NGI, if the right checks and balances aren’t in place, could very easily become a tool that decimates civilian privacy and freedom. Time to invest in a hoodie, I think…

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periol

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#33 [url]

Oct 26 09 9:15 AM

British Spyware Company Working With Repressive Regimes

http://motherboard.vice.com/2012/9/8/mobile-trojans-rear-their-head-repressive-governments-go-for-their-checkbooks

Between February and March of 2011, at the height of Egypt’s tumultuous revolution, protesters stormed the offices of their feared State Security Investigations Service in Alexandria and Sixth of October city, on the edge of Cairo. It was there, amongst evidence of detentions, torture and surveillance at SSIS’s headquarters, that information first came to light regarding a sales pitch by UK-based Gamma Group to Egypt’s security agency for their FinFisher spyware.




FinFisher, for those who may not be familiar, is a powerful piece of spyware long admired within cybersecurity circles. It’s capable of logging keystrokes, accessing and exporting a compromised computer’s files, and intercepting encrypted data such as Skype calls. That Gamma would have at some point presented their product to Egypt’s government is not truly surprising, considering that many Western nations regularly provided military assistance and technology to the country. Regardless, privacy activists were troubled by the find, as they pointed to the unregulated nature of such security products.

It was months later in early 2012, when samples of FinFisher were discovered on computers belonging to Bahraini human rights activists, that privacy experts’ fears were realized. Bahrain, having become another flashpoint of the Arab Spring that swung across the region, experienced violent acts of repression against its citizens, and the discovery of the spyware was only another indication that any persons of interest were under surveillance. The malware had been transmitted to these individuals via email as trojans, stored within .jpg files that were actually executable programs within .rar files, with such tempting subject lines as “torture report” sent by accounts masquerading as those of real journalists.

With solid evidence of the malware’s existence in the wild, it was at this point that several parties became involved in the investigation of FinFisher, including researchers at Citizen Lab and Rapid7. Evidence from the infected computers in Washington, London, and Manama was gathered, and Rapid7 was able to map out the control structure for the malware’s servers located in Indonesia, Australia, Qatar, Ethiopia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, the U.S., Mongolia, Latvia, and Dubai. The story surfaced in American media when it was revealed that one of the servers included a popular Amazon cloud service in the U.S. Researchers with Rapid7 found that all of the controlling servers shared one common trait: all responded to data pings with the cryptic message “Hallo Steffi.”

Both Bahrain’s government and Gamma denied any inappropriate use of spyware tools, and the examined code did in fact confirm that many instances of the FinFisher/FinSpy malware were branded as “demo,” or trial versions, though the geographical location of a controlling server in Manama, Bahrain’s capital, left many uncomfortable questions unanswered.

What’s interesting about malware is that, like a pathogen, there can be more than one way for it to spread, and in the case of FinFisher the latest research produced by Citizen Lab presents evidence that its mobile variant, FinSpy, has made its way onto mobile phones. The latest report points to mobile Trojans built to infect iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, and even Symbian. According to research, this mobile malware has equally impressive capabilities to its desktop big brother, with the ability to record live voice calls, text and email, track the device via GPS, as well as export contacts, calendars, pictures, and other files stored in device memory.

(MORE AT LINK)

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periol

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#34 [url]

Oct 27 09 10:16 AM

ok, maybe i'm the weird one putting this article in this thread.  still, if they've developed the ability to CREATE SHORT-TERM MEMORIES in rats then how far away are they from IMPLANTING SHORT-TERM MEMORIES in us?  as innocuous as this article tries to make it seem, this feels like a step towards turning humans into flash drives.  it's all 1's and 0's folks...

Researchers create short-term memories in-vitro

Ben W. Strowbridge, PhD, Professor of Neurosciences and Physiology/Biophysics, and Robert A. Hyde, a fourth year MD/PhD student in the neurosciences graduate program at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, have discovered how to store diverse forms of artificial short-term memories in isolated brain tissue.

“This is the first time anyone has found a way to store information over seconds about both temporal sequences and stimulus patterns directly in brain tissue,” says Dr. Strowbridge. “This paves the way for future research to identify the specific brain circuits that allow us to form short-term memories.”

Their study, entitled “Mnemonic Representations of Transient Stimuli and Temporal Sequences in Rodent Hippocampus In Vitro,” is slated for publication in the October issue of Nature Neuroscience, and is currently available online.

Memories are often grouped into two categories: declarative memory, the short and long-term storage of facts like names, places and events; and implicit memory, the type of memory used to learn a skill like playing the piano.

In their study, the researchers sought to better understand the mechanisms underlying short-term declarative memories such as remembering a phone number or email address someone has just shared.

Using isolated pieces of rodent brain tissue, the researchers demonstrated that they could form a memory of which one of four input pathways was activated. The neural circuits contained within small isolated sections of the brain region called the hippocampus maintained the memory of stimulated input for more than 10 seconds. The information about which pathway was stimulated was evident by the changes in the ongoing activity of brain cells.

“The type of activity we triggered in isolated brain sections was similar to what other researchers have demonstrated in monkeys taught to perform short-term memory tasks,” according to Mr. Hyde. “Both types of memory-related activity changes typically lasted for 5-10 seconds.”

The researchers also demonstrated that they could generate memories for specific contexts, such as whether a particular pathway was activated alone or as part of a sequence of stimuli to different inputs. Changes in ongoing activity of hippocampal neurons accurately distinguished between two temporal sequences, akin to humans recognizing the difference between two different song melodies. The artificial memories Dr. Strowbridge’s group created in the hippocampus continued to recognize each sequence even when the interval between stimuli was changed.

The new research expands upon a previous study, also published in Nature Neuroscience in 2010, in which Dr. Strowbridge’s group found that isolated pieces of the hippocampus could store which one of two inputs was stimulated. That study also found that a relatively rare type of brain cell, originally described in the 1800′s by the famous Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, but ignored in modern times, played a critical role in the memory effect.

By demonstrating that the same neural circuits also can store information about context, the new study will likely increase the focus on these potential “memory cells” in the hippocampus, called semilunar granule cells, says Dr. Strowbridge.

Understanding normal memory function also lays the groundwork for understanding how neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, affect memory and for developing new, more effective treatments for memory impairments associated with aging.
Read more at http://scienceblog.com/56526/researchers-create-short-term-memories-in-vitro/#d1GS7MKhouCG3QYr.99

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emeline

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#35 [url]

Oct 27 09 10:37 AM

Total Recall.

And of course it would NEVER be misused.  *rolls eyes*.

Hey wait, maybe all of us ALREADY HAVE the false memories implanted? surprise

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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emeline

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#36 [url]

Oct 28 09 5:28 AM

Schools in England and Wales have 100,000 cameras to spy on pupils trained on playgrounds, classrooms and even toilets
 
School pupils are being watched by an astonishing 100,000 spy cameras, a report revealed yesterday.

CCTV surveillance has been set up in playgrounds, classrooms and even toilets and changing rooms.

Some schools have a camera for every five children in the name of controlling violence, vandalism and theft. In fact, the average secondary now has 24 cameras and an academy 30.

In a development that has already provoked outrage among some parents, more than 200 schools have CCTV operating in changing rooms or toilets.

The extent of pupil surveillance was revealed in a report by Big Brother Watch which was based on Freedom of Information replies.

It found there are 106,710 spy cameras in secondary schools and academies across England and Wales – a quarter of the total used to monitor all of London's streets.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2201863/Schools-England-Wales-100-000-spy-cameras-trained-playgrounds-classrooms-toilets-having-children.html#ixzz26ELY1ajQ

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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concernedmomma

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Posts: 2,548

#37 [url]

Oct 28 09 12:02 PM

I'm sorry but I agree with the cameras in the restroom area. NOT right in the toilet ..but atleast in the hand washing area.

When I was growing up my mom was terrified to let my brother go to the men's room "alone" even if she was stood RIGHT OUTSIDE the door waiting and listening, because there was a sicko hiding/waiting for little boys to come in alone and he would grab them, clamping a hand over their mouths, and cut their penis off.

He would then pull their pants up, threaten them to make them be quiet and send them out to mommy, who would move on not knowing anything until a few minutes later when she would see the blood.

Now, thats the 1st reason I agree with it

Look how many kids get beaten up/slapped/abused/hurt just going to the bathroom? Forget it.
Bathrooms are notoriusly the hiding spot of the kids doing no good, like smoking, drugs.

You get my point. When they are adults THEN they can choose to go in a camera free bathroom.

Well aren't you just a fun little lollipop triple dipped in psycho......

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emeline

Silver Monarch

Posts: 10,241

#39 [url]

Oct 28 09 8:33 PM

Unemployed man hauled before a court for calling another man a 'paedophile' in Facebook post that was online for 90 minutes

  • Joseph Griffin posted the abusive message because he felt 'frustrated and angry'
  • Ordered to pay £50 fine, £85 costs, and £15 victim surcharge.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2202143/Facebook-Unemployed-man-hauled-court-calling-man-paedophile-online-post.html

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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djivass

Tinsel Tiller

Posts: 36

#40 [url]

Oct 28 09 9:22 PM

This topic almost reads more like a "How To" on corporate control, spying, violation of civil liberties pamphlet... 

I'm reminded of what my dad said about Prohibition. How some manufacturers of apple cider would put labels on their product:

"Warning! Do not leave this product unrefrigerated or in storage for more than two weeks. Excessive length of time in storage can result in fermentation causing the production of alcohol. This could put you in violation of the 18th Amendment".

The whole purpose of the warning (of course!) was to SELL the product to those folks who actually wished to make booze. Just good advertisement.

Take George W. Bush for instance. He looked at Orwell's "1984" as just another "How To" book...

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