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tlr1138

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Nov 8 08 5:41 PM

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As a former techno-geek in my younger days, an employee in the defense industry for 10 years, and a corporate drone today, I'm very interested in (and paranoid about) the way technology has pushed us towards a 24-hour-a-day surveillance society. A few articles I've collected over the years:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/innovation/11/19/sensors.aging/index.html

Jeff Kaye, director of the Oregon Center for Aging & Technology, said this monitored-all-the-time life will become the norm for older people in the United States within five years, and will be common for people of all ages soon after.

His lab has been conducting research on the benefits of monitoring people all the time, and they have early indications that doctors may be able to spot early Alzheimer's, dementia and indicators a person is susceptible to falls by monitoring their daily lives.

While the technology is basically ready to go now, he said, researchers haven't had enough time to figure out how these systems will work most effectively. Crunching the data can be challenging, and the number of things we can monitor needs to be increased for these systems to provide more valuable info.

"The temperature you sleep at, the particulate matter in the air, the ambient light your body experiences ... drastically can change your physiology, and we are barely aware of it," he said.

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/01/03/microsoft_hopes_to_patent_big_brother/

Judging from a recent patent application, Microsoft hopes to build some sort of "activity monitoring system" that keeps an eye on worker productivity using various "physiological or environmental sensors." These sensors would track everything from heart rate, respiration rate, body temperature, facial expressions, and blood pressure to brain signals and galvanic skin response.

Yes, galvanic skin response is what drives a lie detector.

Redmond sees this system as a way for companies and, um, governments to monitor "group activities." "In particular, the system can monitor user activity, detect when users need assistance with their specific activities, and identify at least one other user that can assist them," the patent application reads, in classic patent speak. "Assistance can be in the form of answering questions, providing guidance to the user as the user completes the activity, or completing the activity such as in the case of taking on an assigned activity."

In other words: If you don't do your duty, the system will make sure your duties are assigned to someone else.

The system is designed to provide its unique brand of "assistance" as workers slave away on various computing devices, including desktops, laptops, and cell phones. But it doesn't just track your physical use of such devices. It also monitors things like "frustration and stress."

 

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_36/b4098032904806.htm

“With time, he and his team hope to build detailed models for each worker, each one complete with a person's quirks, daily commute, and allies, perhaps even enemies. These models might one day include whether the workers eat beef or pork, how seriously they take the Sabbath, whether a bee sting or a peanut sauce could lay them low. No doubt, some of them thrive even in the filthy air in Beijing or Mexico City, while others wheeze. If so, the models would eventually include this detail, among countless others. The idea is to build richly textured models that behave in their symbolic realm just like their flesh-and-blood counterparts. Then planners can manipulate them, looking for the most efficient combinations…This is management in a world run by Numerati. As IBM sees it, the company has little choice. The workforce is too big, the world too vast and complicated for managers to get a grip on their workers the old-fashioned way—by talking to people who know people who know people. Word of mouth is too foggy and slow for the global economy. Personal connections are too constricted. Managers need the zip of automation to unearth a consultant in New Delhi, just the way a generation ago they located a shipment of condensers in Chicago. For this to work, the consultant—just like the condensers—must be represented as a series of numbers. Eventually, companies could take this knowledge much further, using the numbers, in a sense, to clone us. Imagine, says Aleksandra Mojsilovic, one of Takriti's close colleagues, that the company has a superior worker named Joe Smith. Management could really benefit from two or three others just like him, or even a dozen. Once the company has built rich mathematical profiles of Smith and his fellow workers, it might be possible to identify at least a few of the experiences or routines that make Joe Smith so good. "If you had the full employment history, you could even compute the steps to become a Joe Smith," she says. "I'm not saying you can recreate a scientist, or a painter, or a musician," Mojsilovic adds. "But there are a lot of job roles that are really commodities." And if people turn out to be poorly designed for these jobs, they'll be reconfigured, first mathematically and then in life.”

 

http://articles.cnn.com/2010-05-03/tech/smart.dust.sensors_1_smart-dust-sensors-kris-pister?_s=PM:TECH

In the 1990s, a researcher named Kris Pister dreamed up a wild future in which people would sprinkle the Earth with countless tiny sensors, no larger than grains of rice. These “smart dust” particles, as he called them, would monitor everything, acting like electronic nerve endings for the planet. Fitted with computing power, sensing equipment, wireless radios and long battery life, the smart dust would make observations and relay mountains of real-time data about people, cities and the natural environment. Now, a version of Pister’s smart dust fantasy is starting to become reality. “It’s exciting. It’s been a long time coming,” said Pister, a computing professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “I coined the phrase 14 years ago. So smart dust has taken a while, but it’s finally here.” Maybe not exactly how he envisioned it. But there has been progress. The latest news comes from the computer and printing company Hewlett-Packard, which recently announced it’s working on a project it calls the “Central Nervous System for the Earth.” In coming years, the company plans to deploy a trillion sensors all over the planet.

The wireless devices would check to see if ecosystems are healthy, detect earthquakes more rapidly, predict traffic patterns and monitor energy use. The idea is that accidents could be prevented and energy could be saved if people knew more about the world in real time, instead of when workers check on these issues only occasionally.

 

http://www.dailytech.com/IBM+Patent+Application+Describes+Intelligent+Stop+Lights+That+Turn+Off+Cars/article18514.htm

Running red lights and failure to stop leads to untold numbers of traffic accidents around the world. Sitting at a red light with cars idling also burns fuel that really isn’t needed.

IBM has filed a patent application that outlines a system that would turn the motors of a car off at a traffic light to conserve fuel. Few will take issue with green technology that conserves fuel, saves them money, and reduces pollution. However, there is a dark side to the patent application that privacy advocates will not like.

The system IBM is proposing has to have access to the engine of the vehicles at the light to stop the engine. With access to the engine, the traffic lights can not only stop the engine of a driver's car, but it can also determine the duration that the engine is stopped and then when the light is over it can start the motors of the cars up in sequential order so the first cars at the light get to go first. The system would use GPS data to know where vehicles were located at the light.

 

http://www.buffalonews.com/city/article201702.ece

“The computer system detects resentment in conversations through measurements in decibels and other voice biometrics,” he said. “It detects obsessiveness with the individual going back to the same topic over and over, measuring crescendos.”

 

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/11/air-force-looks-to-artificially-overwhelm-enemy-cognitive-capabilities/

”Air Force Wants Neuroweapons to Overwhelm Enemy Minds - It sounds like something a wild-eyed basement-dweller would come up with, after he complained about the fit of his tinfoil hat. But military bureaucrats really are asking scientists to help them “degrade enemy performance” by attacking the brain’s “chemical pathway[s].”

 

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_12/b4124046224092.htm?chan=magazine+channel_new+ideas+for+talent

New software offers a data-mining approach. An employee retention program developed by software company SAS, for example, crunches data on employees who have quit in the past five years—their skills, profiles, studies, and friendships. Then it finds current employees with similar patterns. Another SAS program pinpoints the workers most likely to suffer accidents.

 

The eventual goal is to project how much workers will produce over their careers. In a number-driven labor market, the value of their skills will rise and fall. With these figures in hand, companies will be able to carry out cost-benefit studies on recruiting, training, and employee retention (along with its counterpart, layoffs).

 

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_12/b4124048249066.htm

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are focusing the latest sensor technology on such behavior in the workplace. Using high-tech badges that transmit data on an individual's gestures, eye movements, voice levels, and even proximity to other people, MIT is parsing the physical traits of leadership. Along with highlighting effective managers, researchers hope the data will help train workers to be more effective at everything from networking to dealing with customers.

 

Professor Alex (Sandy) Pentland, who heads the research through MIT's Human Dynamics lab, argues that the technology goes beyond anything captured in a typical personality test. With it, he notes, "you can suddenly look at hundreds of people on a millisecond-by-millisecond basis." In call centers, for example, the MIT team predicts successes and flubs by studying patterns of listening and voice modulations. (Workers with high scores listen more and alter their voice to express interest.) The unit is working with companies such as Hitachi and Bank of America to study employee communication patterns.

 

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_12/b4124058284261.htm?chan=magazine+channel_new+ideas+for+talent

Now companies are taking a page from social networking sites to make the performance evaluation process more fun and useful. Accenture (ACN) has developed a Facebook-style program called Performance Multiplier in which, among other things, employees post status updates, photos, and two or three weekly goals that can be viewed by fellow staffers. Even more immediate: new software from a Toronto startup called Rypple that lets people post Twitter-length questions about their performance in exchange for anonymous feedback.

 

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2009-11/intel-wants-brain-implants-consumers-heads-2020

If the idea of turning consumers into true cyborgs sounds creepy, don't tell Intel researchers. Intel's Pittsburgh lab aims to develop brain implants that can control all sorts of gadgets directly via brain waves by 2020. The scientists anticipate that consumers will adapt quickly to the idea, and indeed crave the freedom of not requiring a keyboard, mouse, or remote control for surfing the Web or changing channels. They also predict that people will tire of multi-touch devices such as our precious iPhones, Android smart phones and even Microsoft's wacky Surface Table.

Turning brain waves into real-world tech action still requires some heavy decoding of brain activity. The Intel team has already made use of fMRI brain scans to match brain patterns with similar thoughts across many test subjects.

Plenty of other researchers have also tinkered in this area. Toyota recently demoed a wheelchair controlled with brainwaves, and University of Utah researchers have created a wireless brain transmitter that allows monkeys to control robotic arms. There are still more implications to creating a seamless brain interface, besides having more cyborgs running around. If scientists can translate brain waves into specific actions, there's no reason they could not create a virtual world with a full spectrum of activity tied to those brain waves. That's right -- we're seeing Matrix creep.

 

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2004151388_apchippingamericaiii29.html?syndication=rss

Here's a vision of the not-so-distant future:

_Microchips with antennas will be embedded in virtually everything you buy, wear, drive and read, allowing retailers and law enforcement to track consumer items — and, by extension, consumers — wherever they go, from a distance.

_A seamless, global network of electronic "sniffers" will scan radio tags in myriad public settings, identifying people and their tastes instantly so that customized ads, "live spam," may be beamed at them.

_In "Smart Homes," sensors built into walls, floors and appliances will inventory possessions, record eating habits, monitor medicine cabinets — all the while, silently reporting data to marketers eager for a peek into the occupants' private lives.

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Nov 8 08 9:09 PM

In the 1990s, a researcher named Kris Pister dreamed up a wild future in which people would sprinkle the Earth with countless tiny sensors, no larger than grains of rice. These “smart dust” particles, as he called them, would monitor everything, acting like electronic nerve endings for the planet. Fitted with computing power, sensing equipment, wireless radios and long battery life, the smart dust would make observations and relay mountains of real-time data about people, cities and the natural environment. Now, a version of Pister’s smart dust fantasy is starting to become reality. “It’s exciting. It’s been a long time coming,” said Pister,
 
This, to me, is why science sucks.  And yes, yes I know all of the wonderful contributions science has made to the planet. 
 
I get to hear about all the latest now that Galt is focusing on cybernetics and systems theory for her thesis.  I'm telling you right now, straight up, if the world continues on we WILL live in a cyborg environment.  Or those that remain certainly will.
 
Machines will be the leaders. And human/computer interface is just around the corner.  It's pretty sickening actually.  At least to me.  That sort of world holds no allure for me at all. 

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#5 [url]

Nov 8 08 10:18 PM

I've been thinking that for a long time, Ches, but here we are still. 

-tlr1138

Well one can point out that even two years ago the high tech quality components could be made by japan , now however that country and its workforce are slowly being chernobyled to death.  Who is going to make the parts and assemble them ?   China ?  sounds good ,their cheap assedness gurantee's the stuff will be shit and not work as advertised.


Too many disruptions in the logistic chains coming right down the pike to make this shit on huge scale , so a muchly reduced population would be required for starters.

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emeline

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Nov 9 08 12:17 AM

Oh it's a race to the finish isn't it? 

It's only a question of whether they can pull it off in time.

This IS the Battle of Armageddon.   The irony is what they use to distract you they also use to enslave you.  Addict you to the poison.  They knew that all along.

They are trying to bring in the 666 system, or total control, but it's even worst than what's described in the book of Revelation.  They are going to make human/machine hybrids.   These will be the new generation of slaves.

See, the trouble with the human commodoties  is that now and again some of them are smart enough and enough get desperate enough to revolt, very pesky.  The obvious solution is to remove their ABILITY to revolt.

They're plugging us into this grid more and more, easy does it, like the unsuspecting frog which enjoys the warm water, blissfully unaware it's about to be boiled.

Most of the sheoples will willingly line up to be plugged in for the "benefits" and "safety" of it.

People could try to get off the grid now, although I don't think that's as easy as it sounds.  

Maybe enough people could wake up and revolt against it, but the problem is most people LINE UP for the kool-aid.  I even wonder if they're engineering economic collapse to force the "new system" on everyone, which I am sure will be spun as their salvation.

Logistic problems might be significant, instability of electronic systems, loss of power grids through a CME, etc.

Probably the best hope is a skilled resistance, a trojan IN their system, sabotaging it......in effect cyber-warriors fighting for the freedom of humanity.


Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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tlr1138

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Nov 9 08 2:00 PM

Yeah, the "internet of things." And it's all sold as a "win-win" situation - It's all good! It will protect the children! It will make things more convenient! It will save us from terrorists! It will help grandma and your little lost puppy and increase worker productivity and help us compete in the global economy! Most people hear that stuff and they just passively go along with it.

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tlr1138

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Nov 9 08 5:34 PM

http://adage.com/article/news/hear-voices-ad/122491/
New Yorker Alison Wilson was walking down Prince Street in SoHo last week when she heard a woman's voice right in her ear asking, "Who's there? Who's there?" She looked around to find no one in her immediate surroundings. Then the voice said, "It's not your imagination." Indeed it isn't. It's an ad for "Paranormal State," a ghost-themed series premiering on A&E this week. The billboard uses technology manufactured by Holosonic that transmits an "audio spotlight" from a rooftop speaker so that the sound is contained within your cranium.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/hardware/virginia-tech-is-building-an-artificial-america-in-a-supercomputer
The group has designed what it claims is the largest, most detailed, and realistic computer model of the lives of about 100 million Americans, using enormous amounts of publicly available demographic data. The model’s makers hope the simulation will shed light on the effects of human comings and goings, such as how a contagion spreads, a fad grows, or traffic flows. In the next six months, the researchers expect to be able to simulate the movement of all 300 million residents of the United States.

http://mashable.com/2010/03/02/data-mining-social-media/
Do you know if your Facebook friends have good credit histories? Likely not, but if you associate with people who are a good credit risk, then you’ll probably be a good credit risk, according to Sandberg. “The whole idea [is] like follows like,” she said.

http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,2058205,00.html
....oddly, the more I learned about data mining, the less concerned I was. Sure, I was surprised that all these companies are actually keeping permanent files on me. But I don't think they will do anything with them that does me any harm.

http://www.stayfreemagazine.org/archives/14/datamining.html
Chuck Petrakis is excited. "Let me give you an example," he says. "Here's Mrs. Smith, who's just been in to see her doctor for a checkup. Say you're her insurance company. You run her records, and the software tells you that she's likely to develop diabetes. Well, that gives you an opportunity to be really proactive."

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Nov 9 08 7:00 PM

New Yorker Alison Wilson was walking down Prince Street in SoHo last week when she heard a woman's voice right in her ear asking, "Who's there? Who's there?" She looked around to find no one in her immediate surroundings. Then the voice said, "It's not your imagination." Indeed it isn't. It's an ad for "Paranormal State," a ghost-themed series premiering on A&E this week. The billboard uses technology manufactured by Holosonic that transmits an "audio spotlight" from a rooftop speaker so that the sound is contained within your cranium.
 


You know, there used to be laws against that kind of shit.  *angry face*

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emeline

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Nov 9 08 7:58 PM

I think they're also conducting experiments on individuals, that the electronic stalking and harrassment phenomenon may be part of that,

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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tlr1138

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Nov 28 08 11:48 PM

I don't think you watched the video, Mtlouie. I seriously doubt you've been through that. Yet.

Check out all 7 parts of this lady's videos on RFIDs:


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tlr1138

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#20 [url]

Dec 23 08 1:14 AM

Ubiquitous Computing - connecting everything and everybody in the world to the internet.



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