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ab

Tin Warrior

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#21 [url]

Jan 17 08 7:02 PM

Funny.. I feel the same way about women in my kitchen!  [image]

-jafo


Lol, damn right Jafo. The only time I like women in the kitchen is when they're washing up the dishes.




Power to the Peoples, man

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emeline

Silver Monarch

Posts: 10,241

#22 [url]

Jan 17 08 7:55 PM

Kitchenwars.  Coming soon to a kitchen near you. grin

And the scary thing is.................there's big KNIVES in kitchens! surprise  And cast-iron frying pans which can be used as deadly weapons....uh oh.

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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tlr1138

Silver Monarch

Posts: 1,812

#23 [url]

Jan 18 08 4:33 PM

“Men are so necessarily mad that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness.” - Blaise Pascal

"The average man, who does not know what to do with his life, wants another one which will last forever." – Anatole France

“Faith is a state of openness or trust. To have faith is like when you trust yourself to the water. You don't grab hold of the water when you swim, because if you do you will become stiff and tight in the water, and sink. You have to relax, and the attitude of faith is the very opposite of clinging, and holding on. In other words, a person who is fanatic in matters of religion, and clings to certain ideas about the nature of God and the universe becomes a person who has no faith at all. Instead they are holding tight. But the attitude of faith is to let go, and become open to truth, whatever it might turn out to be.” – Alan Watts

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tlr1138

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#27 [url]

Jan 20 08 1:51 AM

A few great ones from John Cleese:

"When you get to my age, and I'm 66 now, you realize that the world is a madhouse and that most people are operating in fantasy anyway. So once you realise that, it doesn't bother you much."



"Technology frightens me to death. It's designed by engineers to impress other engineers, and they always come with instruction booklets that are written by engineers for other engineers — which is why almost no technology ever works."



"If I had not gone into Monty Python, I probably would have stuck to my original plan to graduate and become a chartered accountant, perhaps a barrister lawyer, and gotten a nice house in the suburbs, with a nice wife and kids, and gotten a country club membership, and then I would have killed myself."

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emeline

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#28 [url]

Jan 20 08 2:36 AM

TLR oh I love that second quote - he is a man after my own heart!

I only have a cellphone for emergencies but the last one I got came with a 132 page instruction manual.   I hate instruction manuals.   If how to use it isn't self evident, then forget it - that's my theory and I'm sticking to it. grin  So I'm going, nope, ain't reading no stinking instruction manual, I just want to make a goddamned phone call!   As it turns out you do need to read at least some of the instruction manual *sighs*. crying

I got a new car about 3 months ago - not brand new - but fairly recent model.  It took me about a month to work out what all the buttons were for.    I was talking to a friend the other day whose also a vehicle mechanic and he says, oh that's nothing, the new Mercedes cars coming out now you have to go and do a day long course when you buy them just so you "know  what all the buttons do".

These modern cars - you can't even negotiate with them by fiddling with something.  It's horrible.

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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tlr1138

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#29 [url]

Jan 20 08 3:13 AM

I'm becoming more of a techno-phobe as I get older too. I don't want any more gadgets. I have a fairly new car and I just focus on what I need to know and ignore all the other bells and whistles. You don't need to know what most of the buttons do.

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tlr1138

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#30 [url]

Jan 27 08 3:08 PM

From Lewis Mumford's 1951 book "The Conduct of LIfe:"

"...life itself, for the ordinary man...has become less interesting and less significant: it is at best a mild slavery, and at its worst, the slavery is not mild. Why should anyone give to the day's work the efforts and sacrifices it demands? By his very success in inventing labor-saving devices, modern man has manufactured an abyss of boredom that only the privileged classes in earlier civilizations have ever fathomed: the small variations, the minor initiatives and choices, the opportunity for using one's wits, the slightest expression of fantasy, have disappeared progressively from the daily tasks of the common man, caught in big organizations that do his thinking for him. The most deadly criticism one could make of modern civilization is that, apart from its man-made crises and catastrophes, it is not humanly interesting.

"...our mechanized culture has produced a pervasive sense of frustration. No one can possibly know more than a fragment of all that might be known, see more than a passing glimpse of all that might be seen, do more than a few random, fitful acts, of all that might, with the energies we now command, be done: there is a constant disproportion between our powers and our satisfactions. The typical role of the personality today is an insignificant one: non-commanding, unpurposeful. The walls of the outer shell of our life have thickened, and the creature within has diminished in size in order to accommodate himself to this inimical overgrowth.
"The contents of modern man's daydreams too closely resemble those of Bloom in Ulysses, filled with the dead tags of newspaper editorials, the undigested vomit of advertising slogans, greasy crumbs of irrelevant information, and the choking dust of purposeless activity. The duty to become part of this chaos, to keep up with it, to accept it internally, is the bitter duty of modern man...Unfortunately, the more busy the mental traffic, the emptier becomes the resultant life: therefore the more abjectly dependent the individual atom in this society becomes upon the very stimuli which -- though they have, in fact, caused his emptiness -- divert his attention from his plight."

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#31 [url]

Jan 28 08 12:08 AM

tlr-  Thought I'd put up the antithesis of that:

"Let there be a little country without many people.
Let them have tools that do the work of ten or a hundred
and never use them.
Let them be mindful of death
and disinclined to long journey.
They'd have ships and carriages,
but no place to go.
They'd have armor and weapons,
but no parades.
Instead of writing,
they might go back to using knotted cords.
They'd enjoy eating,
take pleasure in clothes,
be happy in their houses,
devoted to their customs.
The next little country might be so close
the people could hear cocks crowing
but they'd get old and die
without ever having been there."

Tao Te Ching

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tlr1138

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#32 [url]

Jan 28 08 12:50 AM

Yup, Taoism is such a refreshingly simple philosophy.

Alan Watts, also from 1951, reads like prophecy:
"...the "brainy" economy designed to produce...happiness is a fantastic vicious circle which must either manufacture more and more pleasures or collapse -- providing a constant titillation of the ears, eyes, and nerve ends with incessant streams of almost inescapeable noise and visual distractions. The perfect "subject" for the aims of this economy is the person who continuously itches his ears with the radio, preferably using the portable kind which can go with him at all hours and in all places. His eyes flit without rest from television screen, to newspaper, to magazine, keeping in a sort of orgasm-without-release through a series of teasing glimpses of shiny automobiles, shiny female bodies, and other sensuous surfaces, interspersed with such restorers of sensitivity -- shock treatments -- as "human interest" shots of criminals, mangled bodies, wrecked airplanes, prize fights, and burning buildings. The literature or discourse that goes along with this is similarly manufactured to tease without satisfaction, to replace every partial gratification with a new desire...Generally speaking, the civilized man does not know what he wants. He works for success, fame, a happy marriage, fun, to help other people, or to be a "real person." But these are not real wants because they are not actual things. They are the by-products, the flavors and atmospheres of real things -- shadows which have no existence apart from some substance. Money is the perfect symbol of all such desires, being a mere symbol of real wealth, and to make it one's goal is the most blatant example of confusing measurements with reality."

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tlr1138

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#33 [url]

Mar 1 08 2:09 AM

From the Frank Capra film “Meet John Doe”:

Beany: What's a hee-lot?

The Colonel: You've ever been broke, sonny?


Beany: Sure, mostly often.

The Colonel: All right. You're walking along, not a nickel in your jeans, you're free as the wind, nobody bothers ya. Hundreds of people pass you by in every line of business: shoes, hats, automobiles, radios, everything, and there all nice lovable people and they lets you alone, is that right? Then you get a hold of some dough and what happens, all those nice sweet lovable people become hee-lots, a lotta heels. They begin to creep up on ya, trying to sell ya something: they get long claws and they get a stranglehold on ya, and you squirm and you duck and you holler and you try to push them away but you haven't got the chance. They gots ya. First thing ya know you own things, a car for instance, now your whole life is messed up with alot more stuff: you get license fees and number plates and gas and oil and taxes and insurance and identification cards and letters and bills and flat tires and dents and traffic tickets and motorcycle cops and tickets and courtrooms and lawers and fines and... a million and one other things. What happens? You're not the free and happy guy you used to be. You need to have money to pay for all those things, so you go after what the other fellas got. There you are, you're a hee-lot yourself.



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emeline

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Posts: 10,241

#34 [url]

Mar 31 08 9:22 PM

“Love is the ability and willingness to allow those that you care for to be what they choose for themselves without any insistence that they satisfy you.” - Dr. Wayne Dyer

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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tlr1138

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#35 [url]

Apr 3 08 2:43 AM

Found this great quote from Kurt Vonnegut:

"For some reason, the most vocal Christians among us never mention the Beatitudes. But, often with tears in their eyes, they demand that the Ten Commandments be posted in public buildings. And of course that's Moses, not Jesus. I haven't heard one of them demand that the Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, be posted anywhere. "Blessed are the merciful" in a courtroom? "Blessed are the peacemakers" in the Pentagon?"

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emeline

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Posts: 10,241

#37 [url]

May 11 08 4:43 AM

I refuse to accept the cynical notion that nation after nation must spiral down a militaristic stairway into the hell of thermonuclear destruction. I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant. I believe that even amid today's mortar bursts and whining bullets, there is still hope for a brighter tomorrow.

Martin Luther King, Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech.

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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broil

Aluminati

Posts: 397

#39 [url]

May 11 08 6:39 AM




Found this great quote from Kurt Vonnegut: "Forsome reason, the most vocal Christians among us never mention the Beatitudes.But, often with tears in their eyes, they demand that the Ten Commandments beposted in public buildings. And of course that's Moses, not Jesus. I haven'theard one of them demand that the Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, beposted anywhere. "Blessed are the merciful" in a courtroom?"Blessed are the peacemakers" in the Pentagon?"

-tlr1138

That's sure a helluva lot better than the only quote I could think of just now:  "When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout."

Oh, there's also one to reassure young people who are asking about something:  "There are no stupid questions, only stupid people."


Jesus saves, Buddha empties, Krishna recycles.

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emeline

Silver Monarch

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#40 [url]

May 11 08 7:03 AM

In the pursuit of knowledge
every day something is added,
In the practice of the Way
every day something is dropped.
Less and less do you need to force things
until finally you arrive at non-action.
When nothing is done,
nothing is left undone.

Lao-tzu

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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