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Jan 9 10 12:20 AM

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Will be all over the place.  Not going to link.

EM!  Could we get a dedicated thread for gas leaks?

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emeline

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#2 [url]

Jan 9 10 2:45 AM

A natural gas explosion in one of New England's biggest cities destroyed two buildings but didn't kill anyone, authorities said.
Firefighters and gas company workers were among more than a dozen people injured in the explosion in downtown Springfield.
It looked as though there had been "a missile strike," police Sgt. John Delaney said.
"It's a miracle ... Nobody got killed," Delaney said.
The explosion blew out all windows in a three-block radius, leaving three more buildings beyond repair and prompting emergency workers to evacuate a six-story apartment building that was buckling.
Officials at two nearby hospitals said 16 victims were transported with injuries, but none was critical.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10849680


Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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#8 [url]

Jan 28 10 5:39 AM

Look closely at that picture.

Doesn't it look like a fire burning on the secondary road to the left of the interstate?

And then in the mountains in the top right corner of the photo it looks like a separate fire, or at least smoke.

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emeline

Silver Monarch

Posts: 10,241

#9 [url]

Jan 28 10 7:55 AM

    I just grabbed a few other photos from that same article.

West Virginia gas blast West Virginia gas blast

Reuters
The blast setting nearby buildings on fire and injuring several people.

Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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emeline

Silver Monarch

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#10 [url]

Jan 28 10 8:03 AM

    Looks like a pretty good site here doing some monitoring:

http://www.naturalgaswatch.org/?cat=8

This Week In Natural Gas Leaks and Explosions – December 3, 2012



Natural gas explosions made national headlines over the past few weeks with high-profile incidents in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Springfield, Massachusetts, but there were many more natural gas leaks and explosions that didn’t garner quite so much attention. That said, you can listen to a compelling recording of the audio feed from the emergency communications channels recorded during the Springfield explosion here.
A natural gas transmission pipeline owned and operated by Pacific Gas & Electric ruptured on Saturday morning, Dec. 1, near Stockton, California, forcing the residents of a six-block area to evacuate their homes, according to a recent media report. Area residents reported hearing a loud boom and seeing a large cloud rising from the site, but investigators stated that no explosion occurred. Investigators have not yet identified the cause of the rupture.


More here:
http://www.naturalgaswatch.org/?p=1658



Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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emeline

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#11 [url]

Jan 28 10 8:06 AM

    Google the words “natural gas explosion” and you get well over 2.2 million hits – that’s because natural gas explosions seem to be occurring with disturbing regularity in this country.

For example:

  • January 19, 2011, a natural gas main explodes in Philadelphia, killing one individual and critically injuring three others.
  • December 29, 2010, a massive natural gas explosion destroys a furniture store in aDetroit suburb, killing two employees. Their families have filed wrongful death suits against the natural gas utility, Consumers Energy.
  • September 9, 2010, an horrific natural gas explosion devastated a neighborhood in San Bruno, California, killing eight people and destroying 38 homes.
The question, we fear, is not if a natural gas explosion of similar magnitude could happen in New York City or some other major American urban center, it’s when.
Indeed, there are more than 5,000 miles of natural gas pipeline beneath the streets, homes and buildings of New York City and according to public records, a significant portion of that underground pipeline is made of aging cast iron that’s prone to leak. Indeed, hundreds of miles of this pipeline are at least 100 years old and some of it even dates back to 1889.
The pipeline that exploded in San Bruno, by comparison, was 62 years old.
Unfortunately, no one can say with any certainty what condition the natural gas pipelines under New York City are in; the only way anyone can find out for sure is when there’s a leak – or worse.
The New York Post ran a story detailing the magnitude of the problem back in September, in the days following the natural gas explosion that destroyed nearly three city blocks in San Bruno, but since that time, the public discourse has moved on, overtaken by current events that have pushed the problem out of the public eye.
As far as the natural gas utilities are concerned, that’s probably a good thing. But San Bruno hasn’t forgotten, and neither should New York City.

How safe is New York City's natural gas infrastructure?

Over the coming weeks and months, NaturalGasWatch.com will track some of these natural gas tragedies, highlighting some of the more disturbing incidents.


More here:


http://www.naturalgaswatch.org/?page_id=11


Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh

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deusvult

Tin Warrior

Posts: 121

#12 [url]

Jan 28 10 1:09 PM

Ya know, since most of these pipelines, especially the primary lines (mains), were all being installed around the same time when natural gas became widely available, it's no surprise that they are all failing at the same time.  I mean, materials only have a certain lifespan for a particular use.  If it's 100 years, then that's what it is.  A quick example:  If you have a light fixture with multiple bulbs and one goes out, you can expect the others to fail soon.  I've seen it a hundred times.  All the bulbs were installed together, so all will fail about the same time.

It's not ironic, or perhaps it is, that the "oil age" lasted 100 years or so and our infrastructure that was built with that cheap energy also seems to be lasting about the same time.  hmmm....  Too bad we don't have enough oil for another oil age to fix all our industrial conveniences.

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concernedmomma

Silver Monarch

Posts: 2,548

#13 [url]

Jan 28 10 3:49 PM

Seems like we have the perfect storm brewing.

That huge sink hole in LA, mixed in with a bunch of failing/weakened/damaged gas lines streaming all over the place, linked to huge holding tanks which are also failing/weakening...

Mixed with huge underground supplies that are very close to the surface ....

Isn't the earth supposed to be off'ed by fire this time?

Explosion domino effect, I wonder how far reaching it would really be. Would it start to effect things like Nuke power plants.

Well aren't you just a fun little lollipop triple dipped in psycho......

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periol

Silver Monarch

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#20 [url]

Jan 29 10 2:48 AM

US gas blast cooks highway, flattens houses


A gas pipe in the US state of West Virginia has exploded, destroying four homes and cooking a section of a main highway. Interstate 77 has reopened in both directions after crews worked through the night to repair damage from the massive natural gas line explosion and fire. The damage from the inferno was breathtaking. Four homes burned and collapsed. Five others were damaged. On the highway, the heat burned utility poles and melted guardrails and pavement. The inferno destroyed four, melted guardrails and left a huge swath of the interstate in Sissonville impassible. With many people at work or school at the time, no one died. But at least one motorist was still shaky long after the fire was out. Sancha Adkins, a respiratory therapist from St. Albans, was heading north on I-77 toward a patient's home in Ripley when a flash alongside the highway caught her eye. She slammed on the brakes and pulled to the shoulder, as did the tractor-trailer behind her, just in time to see a wall of flame roar across the road about 150 feet ahead of her. She tried to back up, but the truck behind her wasn't doing the same fast enough. "I did a U-turn in the middle of the road and literally drove the wrong way on the interstate. I had my hazard lights on flashing, just trying to tell people to get out of the way," she said. There was oncoming traffic as she hugged the berm on the median. "I didn't care," she said. "It wasn't as bad as that explosion." A roughly 800-foot section in both directions on the road was baked by the heat. Transportation Secretary Paul Mattox said crews had to remove asphalt and grind the roadway down to the original concrete before repaving. Federal and state officials are investigating what caused the explosion.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/8074584/US-gas-blast-cooks-highway-flattens-houses

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